One of our faculty members, Dr Neil Archibald, has contributed to the Guardian newspaper’s recent ‘Blood, sweat and tears’ series looking at people’s experience of healthcare.

Neil, who was a graduate of the Parkinson’s Academy before moving into the roles of mentor and faculty, shares his personal story with the newspaper. He explains how his father’s poor experience of Parkinson’s care spurred him on to become the specialist neurology consultant he is today.

Inspired by his father’s experience to start on his professional journey, we asked him to share what kept him passionate about Parkinson’s today.

“Parkinson’s is one of those complex conditions that appeals at both an academic and a clinical level; it’s interesting from a scientific and a human perspective, and people’s experience of it is very unique. How you meet the care and support needs of each individual you see is a real challenge – and how you meet that challenge is very motivating as a clinician.”

Neil has won two awards for the Parkinson’s service he leads and is an honorary psychiatrist within his local Mental Health Trust so that he can effectively treat patients with Parkinson’s psychosis.

He currently practices at the James Cook University Hospital, teaches at the MasterClass, and tweets at @drneilarchibald. Find out more about him, and read the Guardian article to learn more about his experiences.

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